Forever 21

A Design FIT for Greatness

From: Forever 21
Date: 2/05/16
Subject Line: A (F)IT Girl: Tips From SELF Magazine

Forever 21

There’s a lot to like about this gem from Forever 21. The clothing retailer steps up their game by making the email all about the workout. They offer 3 muscle-building moves to add to your routine. Each move is paired with an image of a model in fitness attire that can be purchased. The design is inspiring with many positive takeaways.

Let’s count the things I love about it:
1) Flow. I love the line that draws your eye down the page from the very beginning. The movement continues by use of staggered imagery and text placement.
2) Scanability. The bold and concise headlines make it quick and easy to read.
3) Organization. The large pink numbers provide nice separation between sections. They keep the email from becoming a jumbled mess with no end in sight.
4) Style. The editorial type layout resembles that of a magazine (after all the subject line says the tips come from SELF magazine).
5) Depth. The overlapping imagery in varying sizes adds interest to the design.
6) Theme. The variety of image types include products, exercise equipment, and motivational signs. The image mix adds to the feel of the email so it doesn’t look product driven.
7) Details. The careful attention to alignment gives the design a finished feel. For example: In the first section the number 1, the title and the copy box are all top-aligned. In the next section the vertical lines align with the title and the copy block.

As much as I adore this email, there are a few things I would change:
1) Clearer Instructions. I would have liked to see images or illustrations of the steps for each routine. Sometimes it’s difficult to understand in words; plus, images are so much quicker to scan. If there’s not a good way to work them into the design, a link to a landing page could work.
2) The CTA. I have a few gripes on this one. There is only one call to action for the primary message, and it’s placed at the very bottom. I would have liked to see product names as links throughout the design, as well as a general button above the fold. The CTA wording is also lack luster and unclear: “Shop Now.” I would assume this would take me to fitness clothing, which it does… but then the next section says “Shop Activewear” which goes to a different landing page. So I’m left wondering what the difference is between these sections.
3) Last, I have a small copy suggestion. In the right column of the opening paragraph, it bothers me that it begins with a number. I would have rearranged copy, added words, or spelled out eighteen to make sure that didn’t happen. The length of that line compared to the others also doesn’t settle well with me. It wouldn’t be so bad anywhere else, but it doesn’t work well in the first line of a column. Nit-picky, but that’s my 2 cents.

Overall, I love this email. Nicely done!

Read More

No Pants Hero

Will Drop Pants for Clicks

Just in case you didn’t get the memo: Pants are out. I found it inconceivable and hilarious that I recieved these two strikingly similar emails in the same month. Both feature an animated GIF of a man dropping his pants to reveal his underwear. It’s sure to grab anyone’s attention and maybe even cause a little chuckle – I’ll give them that!

I’ll break down the pros and cons for each email, but I have one suggestion that applies to both. In each, the animated GIF is used to show a multitude of products. For AEO, 5 boxers are shown; in Moosejaw, 3 pants cycle through. I would suggest adding images of these products below the GIF. This will allow the subscriber to 1) get a better view of the product, 2) let them see it for a longer amount of time, and 3) will also provide a link to each product.

From: American Eagle Outfitters
Date: 10/05/15
Subject Line: Pants off, sale on.
See the animated email

American Eagle Outfitters  AEO GIF

PROS

  • Large clear image and headline. It’s eye grabbing and straight forward.
  • The way the links are integrated over the hero image is a nice touch. It’s a nice way of bringing everything together into one solid message.
  • Cute preheader. “More AEO underwear = less laundry…#winning”

CONS

  • 4 Meg GIF = Slow loading time

From: Moosejaw.com
Date: 10/15/15
Subject Line: Keep Your Pants On | Free $10 for Taking a Survey
See the animated email

Moosejaw  Moosejaw GIF

PROS

  • 700K GIF = Quick loading time
  • For those that read the copy, it’s hilariously well written. Here’s a snippet: “Let’s face it, nobody likes wearing pants. As a matter of fact, I’m not wearing any right now. Ever wonder why some people are jerks in the morning? It’s because they had to put on pants.”

CONS

  • Not very scannable copy. I love the humor, but titles or bolded text could help get the point across quicker for those that don’t have time to read.
  • No flow. Everything is full width and stacked. Not ideal.
  • Lack of hierarchy. The first two messages are related, but the third isn’t. It feels out of place. I suggest treating it more like a secondary message by making it smaller, or removing it entirely.

Read More

Sale 101 Hero

Sale Messaging 101

Email marketing can’t be treated like any other form of marketing. Unlike print or websites, emails must follow different standards for language and design. Find out how you can optimize your SALE email message with my tips below!

WORDING:

Email marketing has a bad rep. People automatically associate it with the dreaded 4-letter word: “SPAM.” If your message seems even the least bit misleading, that’s exactly what you’ll be considered. The words “UP TO” or “AS LOW AS” in a sale message can be off-putting to a subscriber. Here’s why: When a subscriber sees “UP TO 70% OFF” they fear they’ll find one item that is 70% OFF while the remainder are nearly full price. It feels like a trick. You can be sure if they do click through and find that their fears were justified, they won’t be making that mistake twice. You’ve just lost all credibility.

Here are a few guidelines to follow to avoid misleading language and keep your subscribers happy.

40% (or more) off shoes
Use the mode percentage (percentage that appears most frequently), rather than the highest savings. This will set a more accurate representation of what you have to offer and won’t lead to disappointment. If everyone followed this simple rule, the only time we’d see “up to” is when the majority of products were at the max discount possible. Even if that’s the situation for you, I suggest not using it because abusers have ruined this phrase for all of us. This is why we can’t have nice things. 😉

Save 25% on ALMOST everything!
This can be a nice way to call out the mode as well, but only use phrases like “almost all” or “nearly all” if it’s true. Don’t be the boy that cried wolf.

60% off hundreds of items!
Help alleviate the worry of limited selection by calling out the number of products on sale. This can be generalized (40% off half of our store) or separated into categories (more than 25 shoes now 60% off) as well.

All shoes 70% off, All shirts under $20
If your savings can encompass an entire section, use it to your advantage. Provide separate links for the different categories or price points.

30-60% off the entire store
Use a savings range. It’s not the most glamorous solution but it’s honest and if used in combination with images and a breakdown of savings it can be a great option.

HUGE summer sale!
Omit percentages or prices all together. Use creative language or urgency to get your message across. Don’t overdo it if your sale isn’t really that great though or you might lose future clicks.

DESIGN:

Unlike other mediums, emails require the extra step of clicking-through. So, what may keep a subscriber from clicking?

One factor is the fear that they won’t find good deals or worthwhile products. Show that you have something to offer by including product images that highlight the discount. It will also provide visual queues to spark the subscriber’s interest.

Another factor is that they’ve grown numb to seeing the same text-based sale message again and again. If you’re sending frequently, varying product images will also help to keep your designs from getting stale and will show the customer that there’s something new to check out.

Although product images aren’t always needed, I find myself much more likely to click on an email that includes them. If you choose to go without them, find other ways to make your message interesting. Animation is a nice eye-catching solution. You can also mix in fun graphics. A clever theme or wording can really make an email stand out too. Just remember not to reuse the same image-less design again and again or it will lose its allure, no matter how good your deals are.

Here are some examples of sale emails done right:

From: Pottery Barn Kids
Date: 9/15/15
Subject Line: FURNITURE FLEA! Up to 40% off fresh new finds ☚

This email from Pottery Barn Kids is a great example of how to include product images in a sale email and highlight the savings. Although it uses the words “up to,” it shows there are many worthwhile products with great savings to check out.

Pottery Barn Kids

From: ThinkGeek Overlords
Date: 9/15/15
Subject Line: 20% off (or more!) on some of our greatest hits: press play & SHOP!

With the title “30 Greatest Hits: 20% OFF or much, much more!”, ThinkGeek shows us how to avoid the words “up to” by using the mode percentage. They also mention how many products can be found and they provide some product images as well. Score!

ThinkGeek


From:
Williams-Sonoma
Date: 9/16/15
Subject Line: Fall Bake Sale! 20% Off Pans, Mixes & More – In Stores & Online

This email from Williams-Sonoma is a nice example of how to include click-worthy images even when you can’t call out products specifically (due to inventory issues or what-have-you). What they do instead is include an image to represent each category. The key is to choose images placed in a setting to make it feel more generalized. These pictures give the feeling of the baking process or entertaining, as opposed to a cut-out image of a baking tool.

When I look at this email and see the picture of the beautiful pecan pie, it inspires me to shop for Thanksgiving. When I see the mixing bowls, I’m reminded that my set could use an update. I’m, personally, 100 times more likely to click on this email than an email that just says SALE. I don’t need to use my imagination to know what treasures I may find.

Williams-Sonoma

From: J. Crew
Date: 9/14/15
Subject Line: Don’t forget to shop 25% off select fall must-haves (ends tonight)
Date: 9/10/15
Subject Line: It’s the end of you-know-what. Here’s how to cope…

J. Crew delivered these unique image-less emails. Clever wording can sometimes be enough to attract interest from time to time. Just don’t over-use it, or it will get old fast.

J. Crew  J. Crew

From: Crazy 8
Date: 9/18/15
Subject Line: Entire site up to 65% off, 4 days only!

Crazy 8 does a great job at using a savings range in this example. They mention the range at the top of the email (entire site 40-65% off), and then go on to explain what can be found at which percentages (40% off regular price items and 20% off all markdowns). They also included a product image which is nice, but I would love to see more images. It’s also too bad they used the “up to” phrase in the subject line.

Crazy 8

Read More